All About Barley: An Underdog to be Reckoned With

All About Barley: An Underdog to be Reckoned With

Beer, Bread, Soup and a Unit of Measurement

Alike wheat and rice, barley started out as a grass that has nourished humans for over 7000 years. Some of the earliest findings to the cultivation of this barley grass take us back to ancient Egyptian farmers who mastered this crop turning it into both bread and beer (a complete meal one may argue). The ancient Egyptians were, however, not the only people that took a liking to this nutty flavoured crop. Barley played an important role in cultures across the globe as an iconic ingredient in traditional Hebrew, Greek and Roman food. Even in northern Europe, the dependence on barley cannot go unnoticed. 

What do you get when you line up three grains of barley? 

This may sound like the beginning of a bad joke to our modern ears but in the 14th century England this was serious business. Alike many of the historic units of measurement, they were based on actual things and barely was a prime candidate. In 1324 King Edward II of England set a new standard for the length of one inch, which is the exact distance that 3 grains of barley span when lined up lengthwise. If this seems like an uncertain measurement that is all but an exact unit, you are not alone. The English businessmen at the time were of a similar opinion and demanded the king be more clear. This lead to the king issuing an official decree that defines the exact units which are used in England to this day. The decree stated that 3 corns of barley make one inch, twelve inches make one foot and 3 feet make up one yard. 

Properties

There are two main varieties of barley which are distinguished by the number of rows the plant has. The six-row barley has six grains per row and contains more protein which makes it especially suitable for producing animal feed. According to estimations by the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) ca 70% of barley produced ends its journey as animal feed. The two-row barley only contains three grains per row and contains higher levels of sugar making it ideal for malt production used in alcoholic beverages. Malting barley gives beer, whiskey and even barley wine. When barley is used in baking such as making bread, a smaller less poofed loaf can generally be expected. Compared to wheat barley contains less gluten making it more compact and tough. Barley also has many other use cases. During the first and second world war, roasted barley was used as a substitute for coffee. Roasted barley coffee is still a popular caffeine-free alternative to traditional coffee beans today. 

Cultivation and Harvest

Much like other grains, barley is an annual crop. However, unlike the other cereals, it is especially hardy. Barley is incredibly adaptable to its environment and temperatures. For example, though the ideal temperature for barley germination ranges between 12°–25°C, any range between 4°–37°C is good enough for the crop. Barleys growing period is equally impressive. Though it ideally needs 90 days, it is able to both grow and ripen in much less time than any other cereal. During its growth, the crop also shows exceptional resistance to heat. Farmers in regions around North Africa tend to battle with near-desert conditions. However, when sowing barley in the autumn time even these conditions are no match for barley. As soon as it has ripened and the crops moisture content is below 12% it is ready for harvesting. The cultivation process of barley including sowing and harvesting is the same as that of other cereal crops. 

Disease Management 

Barley may be as close to a super crop as cereals may come, but even it has its weaknesses. A portion of the diseases that barley plants are prone to develop are shared with wheat such as brown rust, yellow rust and mildew. Ramularia is a fungal infection unique to barley and is mainly caused by infected seeds. Symptoms of this disease are characterised by small brown spots across the leave that cause it to die. What can be done about it?

With precision farming tools barley growers can receive much of the same help as wheat farmers get. Using various vegetational indices to measure the crops wellbeing and early detecting threats such as pests and diseases makes a significant difference. Similarly, correctly addressing the varying need for nutrition in a barley field too is crucial. Barley may be the most resilient cereal, but all plants need water. Using remote sensing to optimize the irrigation of barley is especially important for farmers in hotter climates. 

Barley is an impressive crop that can withstand almost anything for being a cereal. With optimized nutrition, irrigation and pest management it truly has the potential to become one of the most important crops.

 

Quiz Answers

Across:

1. B-vitamin

3. Coffee

Down:

2. Egypt

4. Animal feed



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All About Rice: Delicious, Versatile and World Heritage

All About Rice: Delicious, Versatile and World Heritage

Delicious, versatile and world heritage

Did you know the rice plantations called the Rice Terraces of the Philippine Cordilleras has been crowned a UNESCO World Heritage?

The earliest archaeological discoveries around the cultivation of rice date back to 7000–5000 BCE in China. Like other major crops today, such as wheat, rice started as a simple wild grass favoured by early farmers. Through the millennia and selective breeding, we have more than 40,000 different types of rice to choose between.

Today ca. 496 million metric tons of rice are produced each year globally. Though rice paddies can be found in most corners of the world, including Europe, most rice (90%) is still grown in Asia. China is in the lead among all rice-producing countries, producing ca 209 million metric tons in 2019, ca 41% of the global production. In Africa, rice is the fastest-growing source of food. This global rice production is essential. Ca. 50% of the world’s population is dependent on rice for their daily food leading to 95% of all rice produced being consumed by humans.

Cultivation 

Though their use cases and flavour profiles vary, each of the thousands of rice kinds can be divided into two categories: the Japonica and Indica varieties. Japonica rice grains are much shorter, rounder and stickier. These are ideal for foods where such textures are preferable and important to the dish, such as sushi. The Indica varieties are long-grain rice, and an example of this is the Basmati rice. 

All rice (except for upland rice) is grown using water, lots of it. Two examples of common locations suitable for rice plantations are tidal deltas and rivers. From seed to a delicious side to a homemade curry, its lifecycle starts in a rice bed. Here the little seedlings are left to grow for 25 to 50 days. After that, they are moved to large rice paddies where the water is between 5 to 10 cm deep. Early farmers transplanted the tiny plants manually, which remains a viable option for farmers today that don’t have access to modern machinery. For farmers who do, the so-called Rice Transplanter is a helpful hand. The rice transplanter can plant multiple rows simultaneously by taking the seedling and pushing them into the soft waterlogged ground. For the remainder of the growing season, the plants are partially submerged under the water. Keeping the correct water levels is critical, and farmers often manually adjust this irrigation system using dams. Another factor of a successful rice harvest is sunshine, long continuous periods of it. Though sun and water may seem like basic requirements for any crop to grow, it has a much more considerable impact on yields. Rice yields are known to have a substantial variation from 700 to 4,000 kg/hectare.

Harvest

For the growth of the rice plants, water is essential, but during harvest, it is detrimental. Before the harvest can occur, the rice fields must be completely drained of all water that the farmer took such care to keep at exact levels. If the farmer wants to use a harvester or a thresher, the grains cannot contain more than 14% moisture to prevent them from degrading when stored. After the grains have been harvested from the field, further processing steps have to be taken. Each grain of rice has a husk that needs to be removed. Removing the husk is commonly done using a mortar and pestle manually or in a more automated fashion. Under the husk is the so-called bran layer. This layer is darker in colour. Rice that still has this layer when sold is commonly referred to as brown rice. The bran is made up of ca. 8% protein and contains other trace elements such as iron and calcium. When the bran has been removed, we are left with the white rice most of us are familiar with. However, the stems, husks, and bran left after the rice has been processed are not wasted. These stems, for example, can become animal feed, and the bran can be used to create an oil that can be used in anything from cosmetics to frying food.

Disease Management

Like other crops, rice is vulnerable to disease. Bacterial Leaf Blight and Brown Leaf Spot are two examples of these. Bacterial Leaf Bight as given by its name, is a bacterial infection that is believed to prefer conditions of heavy rainfall and wind. This disease has been found to have an enormous impact on yield loss, especially in Asian countries. Brown Leaf Spot is a fungal disease spread from one seed to another and can affect the rice plant as early as its seedling stage. It has been found that damage from Brown Leaf Spot is especially prevalent in nutrient-deficient soil and can be an indicator of soil fertility. 

How can rice cultivations be easier to manage? 

Precision farming can offer practical solutions that give rice farmers greater economic profitability. Seeding and applying fertilizer more precisely has an impact on the quality and size of the yield but are not the only advantages that precision farming has to offer. Correct irrigation is a cornerstone of yield success. To save water waste during irrigation and prevent excessive nutrition loss from too high irrigation levels, fields must be properly levelled. This entails moving soil from one area of the field to another until it is even. Besides optimising irrigation, precision farming can also accurately measure soil fertility. This not only benefits yield outcomes by ensuring the plant’s growth but, as mentioned earlier, has direct ties with the spread of diseases such as Brown Leaf Spot.

From an everyday meal to a prized cultural heritage, rice is a versatile crop that nourishes and sustains billions of people across the globe. 

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All About Wheat: From a Simple Grass to a Staple Product

All About Wheat: From a Simple Grass to a Staple Product

From Wild Grass to a Staple Product 

As we have discussed in our History of Farming series, humans began cultivating crops thousands of years ago. Wheat was among the first of these crops to be strategically grown. However, in the same way, that we have influenced the genetic expression of these plants (e.g. giving us bigger yields), their cultivation has left an everlasting mark on our society. 

Wheat is a rather picky crop, demanding specific conditions in order to grow and prosper. Even though wheat came about naturally, the proper soil and environmental conditions required are not reliably found everywhere. This required the early farmers to adopt cultivating strategies that we still use today, such as removing weeds, improve irrigation, and even fertilization. With limited equipment, this physically demanding work to ensure the wheat wellbeing left a toll on the farmers. Fossil records of the early farmers show that such work leads to a broad range of health problems such as arthritis and slipped disks. For the emerging societies, this too brought about great change. Tending to the wheat plans was all-encompassing, and hence regularly moving and leaving behind their cultivations was not an option. Humans decided to create lasting settlements next to their fields. 

Wheat Today

What once was a simple grass has now become a mightly crop. Today, wheat plants can be found across the globe and are the second most popular crop after maize and rice. Annually covering ca 250 million hectares of land, wheat is eaten by 2.5 billion people across 89 countries with many different varieties available. 

The Worlds Favorite Wheat

Due to the varying climate conditions, different countries or regions prefer to grow different kinds of wheat. This is is important, as the climate dictates when a regional growing and harvesting season is. 

France is the biggest wheat producer in Europe, with an annual output of ca 47 million tonnes. Here winter wheat is the main kind of wheat cultivated. Winter wheat is generally in October and is ready for harvest in August the year after. With about 126 million metric tons produced per year, China is the biggest wheat producer in the world. Through China also grows spring wheat (planted in early spring and harvested in late summer) winter wheat is produced in much larger quantities. Similar trends are found in India and Russia who are the second and third-biggest wheat producers. They too prefer to cultivate winter wheat. Why? Let’s take China as an example. For Chinese farmers, one great advantage of growing winter wheat is that it matures earlier. This gives them time to also cultivate other crops such as vegetables. Unlike spring wheat, it has also been found that winter wheat is less likely to undergo so-called preharvest sprouting. Pre-harvest sprouting is when the grains of e.g. wheat plant start to sprout on the mother plant before the farmer has had the chance to harvest. It is a serious issue as it makes the grains unusable. 

Harvesting

How wheat is harvested can have some slight variations depending on where in the world you find yourself. In most European countries, farmers use modern machinery that has been created specifically for the harvest of grains (such as wheat). Here, the so-called Combine-Harvester steals the show, and rightfully so. It is a versatile machine that automates the majority of the harvesting process. As the farmer drives the Combine-Harvester across the field the machine cuts the straws and separates the grains from it. The grains are then saved in a specialized tank in the harvester while the straws are chopped and pushed back out into the field. 

In other parts of the world where access to modern agricultural machinery is limited, the harvesting process is still mostly manual. Here farmers often use a sickle to cut the straws. Separating the berries from the straws is also done manually. Here the berries are knocked off the straw, raked, and sieved to ensure no small leaves or straw pieces are left. 

Yields

The global average production of wheat today lies at ca 3546.8 kg/ha and is 118,33 % greater than it was 50 years ago in 1970 (ca 1624 kg/ha). One factor that we can attribute the general increase of wheat production to (which dates back much longer than the 1970s) is the makeup of the grain itself. Much like the first farmers noticed, targeted selection allows us to produce grains with beneficial traits, with yield size being a focal point. Compared to the modern strains we use today, the ancient or historical grains result in lower yields and are much more vulnerable to pests and diseases. However, from a cultural perspective, limited cultivation for the purposes of producing traditional dishes may still have a valuable contribution to society. 

When comparing ancient and modern wheat, gluten is an unavoidable topic and has in recent years received a very negative image. As summarized in a review by Harvard University, there is no empirical research that has found support for gluten being a harmful component in our diet, unless one suffers from an underlying condition such as Non-celiac Gluten Sensitivity, Wheat Allergy or Dermatitis herpetiformis (DH). In fact, Harvard University also mentions that gluten may have an important function in our guts as it has been found to stimulate the activity of so-called bifidobacteria in the colon which is present in healthy guts. Without these, individuals may come to suffer from gastrointestinal diseases such as bowel disease and colorectal cancer. 

So even though our daily food may not comprise of the traditional cuisine of our ancestors, we can sit back and relax as we enjoy some of our most favourite foods. Whether it is a flaky croissant, chewy sourdough bread, or crunchy homemade pizza, these would not be the same without wheat and gluten. 

Diseases

Pre-harvest sprouting is not the only problem that a wheat farmer may come across. There are many diseases that wheat plants can suffer from (e.g. brown rust, fusarium ear blight, mildew, yellow rust) and have a big impact on harvest loss. 

When it comes to disease management and its prevention, time is the farmer’s best friend. Being able to quickly detect the onset of diseases is key to save the harvest, however, detecting them on time is difficult to do manually. Precision agriculture has a lot to offers in this regard. Making use of Vegetation Indices (IVs), diseases can be detected early. This gives the farmer the time needed to take the required action to prevent the spread of the disease and saves the crops. However, there is more to yield size than disease management or whether a modern kind of wheat is grown. 

As we mentioned, wheat is a little pickier than a lot of other crops. Farmers have to keep tabs on numerous factors throughout the growing season, to ensure the plants grow properly. Soil health, sufficient and timely plant grow and irrigation is key and needs to continuously be monitored. However, one of the most impactful yet is fertilization. This is traditionally utterly labour-intensive and time-consuming. Yet, precision agriculture can improve even this aspect of cultivation. Using similar techniques and various Vegetation Indices alike what is used for disease detection, farmers can get detailed information about their fields directly to their phones and tablets. Taking fertilization as an example, farmers can receive precise recommendations on how much fertilizer each area of the field requires. Better yet, the fertilizer output is automatically varied by the machinery itself. This does not only make it easier and saves the farmer valuable time, but costs as well. 

Found in pantries across the world wheat has had an astounding impact on how we humans live our lives. Though its cultivation may be demanding, the products we are able to make and the millions of lives it nourishes surely make it work the effort!

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History of Farming: And So Begins the Space Age

History of Farming: And So Begins the Space Age

And So Begins the Space Age.

10:29 p.m, 4 October 1957, the first satellite was launched. Ninety-five minutes later, it had completed its first orbit around the Earth, and with it, a new era began. Though Sergei Korolev and his team did not set out to solve the agricultural challenges of the future, it is one of the fantastic ways in which satellites are used today. 

From Sputnik to Landsat 8

Going to space to take a closer look at Earth seems counter-intuitive. Yet, since the dawn of agriculture, humans have turned to the sky. Predominantly in the hope for favourable conditions that would allow their crops to grow. Today, we too turn towards the sky, but for concrete answers when conditions are not what we need them to be. So how did we get here?

Let’s take a step back to the 1960s. Though globally remembered as one of the most tumultuous decades, it is here that the idea of using satellites to observe the conditions of natural resources on Earth was born. At first, this idea was greatly opposed. The concerns were many ranging from national security to being too expensive. After all, there were already aircraft carriers that were able to collect data through remote sensing. However, using aeroplanes to collect data on a global scale is more than limiting. By 1970 the debate was finally settled, and two years later, the first Landsat satellite (Landsat 1) was launched. We were now able to collect remote sensing data from space! 

Since then, many more Landsat satellites have been launched, with Landsat 8 being the most recent, in 2013. With each launch, the satellites (Landsat and others) capabilities have become more sophisticated and improved the data we receive. Examples of such are the development of various so-called Vegetation Indices (VI) that provide farmers with a broad range of data from plant health to soil fertility and irrigation advice.

Simultaneously, other technologies have been developed with similar goals in mind. Many of these are complementary and allow farmers to automate the application of the remote sensing data they receive about their cultivations. GPS enabled tractors and spreaders are great examples. These are especially useful in precision farming, where they allow farmers to optimise their outputs in line with the needs of their fields, based on the remotely sensed data. Even the use of drones and various sensors is worth mentioning here. Though their use is utterly limited (in comparison to the rich & readily available satellite data), it speaks to the innovative nature of the agricultural industry and the hardworking farmers that are true pioneers in their own right

The future we are heading towards and the future we aim for.

The future we envision is sustainable, sufficient and stable. To achieve this, we have to solve a few challenges. How far away are we?

Food production & rapid environmental changes are critical challenges that we need to solve in the coming 30 years and largely go hand in hand. The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) shares that experts identified an increased need for digitalisation of the agricultural sector, and that precision farming is a solution. The European Commission agrees that precision farming can solve the many challenges around food production. In connection to this digitalisation, they share that reports show that in Europe between 70-80% of all new machinery sold contain equipment that supports precision agricultural practices. Though numbers in other areas of the world may be lower, they shine a hopeful light on the adaptation of sustainable and profitable technology. 

So how far away are we?

If the past 10 000 years of farming has taught us anything, farming is an innovative sector and constantly solves problems as they evolve. The agricultural sector is already working hard to tackle the current food production problems. But we need to keep our eye on the ball (or satellite). If we continue to optimise our resources by applying the best practices that precision agriculture has to offer, we have a green future ahead of us. 

 

What farming future would you like to see? How far away do you think we are?

We would love to hear your thoughts! Please, email us at hello@vultus.se

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History of Farming: Champagne, Jazz and the Farmall

History of Farming: Champagne, Jazz and the Farmall

Versatility

Innovation for the sake of innovation is not enough, whatever process or tools are used, they should be versatile. This is especially evident in farming. When optimisation and versatility meet, problems are not only solved but improve the work of millions of farmers across the world. Our first example of such an innovation takes us back to the 1830s. 

The Combine

Whether you call it the Combine Harvester-Thresher, Combine Harvester or simply Combine, its automation of several tedious processes makes it one of the best innovations in farming. But what exactly made it so special?

In the 1830s the Reaper was invented and helped automate harvesting, even for small grains which up until this time still had to be cut manually using a sickle. Yet onces the grain had been cut, farmers still needed to manually rake and bind the crop manually. This process was somewhat improved by 1857 with reapers that could pass the reaped crop to the back of the machine where the farmer sat and manually tied it into bundles. By 1881 a further step to automation was taken with the successful development of reapers that also could automatically tie the crop into bundles. 

Similarly and equally important as the reaping of the crop, is the threshing. Separating the kernels from the straws too was a manual process, and took a long time even when animals were used as help. Kernels were manually knocked from the straws, raked and sieved. After many improvements this entire process too was automated. Taking these two processes and combining them into one machine, gives us the modern Combine Harvester-Thresher and can still today be found virtually on all farms. 

The Farmall 

Welcome to the 1920 United States. Up until this time many important innovations have been made, such as the threshing machine. Yet in this new post war area, a new feat of engineering optimization takes the throne. 

The use of animals in agricultural production had been replaced by the first tractors some time back. This made work simpler and also allowed farmers to save a greater portion of their yield to be sold, which otherwise would have fed the horses who pulled the machinery. However, these tractors were bulky and heavy. As a result much of the work related to planting and cultivating row-crops was still done using horses. Tractor manufacturers had made attempts to produce tractors tailored for such work specifically. These were largely rejected by farmers. Paying big money for a tractor that serves a very limited use throughout the year was not an option for most farmers. Tractors need to be versatile. 

The International Harvester company set out to solve this problem, and introduced the so-called Farmall in 1924. As given by its name, this new tractor could be used for a large variety of tasks from planting row crops, plowing to pulling heavy machines such as harvesters. Being a true all-purpose tractor, it managed to replace horses all together while being sold at an affordable price. Soon other manufacturers began producing tractors with the same capability which became the new standards on farms. 

Versatility remains an important factor even on today’s farms and rightfully so. Farmers need accurate, reliable and fast services that help make their daily work easier at an affordable price. Thanks to modern technology, this has become possible. Instead of needing to invest in expensive equipment or lengthy and infrequent lab results, satellite data can combine everything farmers need to know in one app. The modern Combine doesn’t dwell in the fields, but scans them from above and delivers all data farmers need in real time, directly to one platform. 

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Vultus Enters the Ukranian Precision Farming Market

Vultus Enters the Ukranian Precision Farming Market

Vultus enters the Ukrainian precision farming market.

The founder and CEO of Vultus, Robert Schmitt, spoke about this in a comment for Latifundist.com (https://latifundist.com/novosti/53946-na-ukrainskij-rynok-tochnogo-zemledeliya-vyhodit-shvedskaya-kompaniya-vultus).

He noted that Vultus sees in Ukraine a significant potential for increasing production efficiency through precision farming tools.

“Ukraine is a large market, and we hope to become a leading player in precision farming services. We can really help Ukrainian farmers increase their yields and reduce costs through differentiated fertilization. Also, Vultus tools can significantly reduce the likelihood of crop loss due to undetected plant diseases or pests, “said Robert Schmitt.

Also, the company sees many opportunities to improve the performance of both the agricultural industry as a whole and an individual farmer.

“Our goal is to take a leading position in the agro-technological sector of the Ukrainian market. We are big agricultural enthusiasts, and we strongly believe in innovation, and therefore are interested in the widest possible dissemination of knowledge about precision farming and the use of satellite data analysis to build an agronomic strategy for the season,” commented Robert Schmitt.

We look forward to our work together and see beneficial prospects of optimization of everyday work for Ukranian farmers.

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History of Farming: What Farming Was like 10 000 Years Ago

History of Farming: What Farming Was like 10 000 Years Ago

What makes a civilization last?

Adaptation. Farmers have always been innovators, and necessarily so. For our societies to grow and thrive, farming needs to adapt to change. In this blog series, we will give a glimpse into some of the most important creations up until today, that allows us to sustain a population of over 7.6 billion people.

The History of Farming

Let us start at the beginning. The time is 10.000 B.C.E, and we find ourselves in the so-called Fertile Crescent, stretching across today’s Middle East. Among the rich soil and marches that covered the area, one of the most important inventions that our modern society still depends on is made. It is during this Neolithic Period that humans transitioned from hunter-gatherers to becoming farmers. We began to domesticate plants.

Plant Domestication

What distinguishes ancient and modern crops?

Our modern crops would considerably stand out among the markets of ancient Persepolis, at first sight due to their size. Plant domestication first began to make harvesting easier. Taking the first wheat as an example, the ripe grains easily scatter with the wind and fall to the ground. This makes the harvest and collecting of grains a labor-intensive process. To make harvesting more manageable, we started to select wheat plants whose grains remain attached to the stem, even when ripe. 

Through this selective cultivation, our crops have grown larger and produce a steadily increasing harvest. This process of selecting plants with desirable traits allows us to raise such a significant quantity of food today. However, not only the size of the crops increased. Through the same selection process, we have produced crops with higher nutritional values than their historic wild counterparts. The wheat, corn, and rice we grow today can make up 40% of our daily calorie intake.

Irrigation Systems and The Plow

Plants need water and the right soil conditions to thrive. Once we had begun to cultivate plans, we started to optimize. Though the landscape of the Fertile Crescent has changed dramatically since the first humans settled there, the intense heat famous for the region today was already present then. To make the most of the land and growing season, around 5.000 B.C.E we began to make use of the natural flooding of floods and waterways to irrigate our crops. The most famous example of this is the Nile. With reliable annual flooding, the farmers of ancient Egypt build waterways to direct the overflowing water out to their fields. Without such an irrigation system, they would not have been able to grow and support the empire that Egypt was soon to become. 

Preparing the soil for a new harvest is a crucial step to ensure proper crop growth and a large harvest. The reason for this lies in the nutrition, and soil health that enables plants to grow. To bring new nutrient-rich soil to the surface for the new seeds to grow, the ancient Sumerians invented the plow. Though initially operated by humans, before it was attached to horses and cattle, it made the everyday fieldwork of farmers across the region much easier. 

Though the ancient Egyptians and Sumerians contributed with great inventions still used today, their once great empires are no longer around. This highlights the importance of adaptation. A rapidly changing climate has played a decisive role in the collapse of many once-great civilizations, including Egypt. The extreme droughts and changing of the previous reliable natural cycles (flooding of the Nile) made the once fertile land uninhabitable. Though the problems farmers around the world faced thousands of years ago may still be on our minds, today, we are equipped to handle them. We can adapt much faster and combat extreme weather conditions such as drought, thanks to modern technology enabling precision agriculture. 

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Partnership with Don State Technical University

Partnership with Don State Technical University

We are delighted to announce our partnership with Don State Technical University, based in Rostov-on-Don in Russia. The university is one of the leaders in innovations of the agricultural sector. They too believe precision farming tools as one of the key drivers to the effectiveness and sustainability of agricultural business today as well as the future.

Together we set out to develop an IT platform for Russian agricultural businesses that automates their production management and provides access to precision farming tools such as:

  • Soil fertility analysis based on soil organic carbon and field zoning
  • Soil productivity maps and yield forecasting based on historical field data analysis
  • Nitrogen prescriptions (crop specific)
  • Plant health monitoring (crop specific either)
  • Water Stress analysis and irrigation maps

We look forward to our work together and see beneficial prospects of optimization of everyday work for Russian farmers.

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Early Access

Early Access

We are constantly working on improvements for our products and services based on the feedback from our Clients & Partners and here we are proud to announce the v 3.0.0 release of VultusApp. We have carefully analyzed the user experience and functionality needs, therefore we present you the latest changes to the App:

Tutorial

We have replaced the tutorial walkthrough with specific help buttons throughout the interface. That way you can easily receive specific information about any section of the interface. This also means that the walkthrough button will no longer be available in the Account Menu tab.

New options

  1. We have added Water Stress and Zoning to the list of available services.
  2. Likewise, there is now an opportunity to ad what crop you grew in the previous years on the specific field. After you have added your field (just like before) do the following:

Select the icon to edit the field > “Crop Types By Years” > Choose date interval > Choose the crop type > “Add” > “Save” > Done!

  1. Want to change the borders of your field after you have already added it? No problem with the new “Change Polygon” button.

Select the icon to edit the field > “Change Polygon” > Modify the boarders of the field as needed > “Save” > Done!

Free Users

We have made the following updates to the free user subscription

  • All users have access to all services
  • The free user date limit to 365 days
  • The maximum field size that can be added is 1000 hectares
  • The maximum hectares for the free subscription is 5000 per user/farm
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SVT Nyheter Interviewed our CEO about Satellite Data in Irrigation

SVT Nyheter Interviewed our CEO about Satellite Data in Irrigation

Vultus in SVT Nyheter!
Our CEO Robert Schmitt and farmer Gustaf Ramel were interviewed by SVT. Listen to our CEO talk about the use of satellites to monitor the water levels in the fields.

Access the full article and video: https://lnkd.in/eKwC4QY

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